Volume 38, Issue 14 p. 5354-5367
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Predicting future frost damage risk of kiwifruit in Korea under climate change using an integrated modelling approach

Yeomin Jeong

Yeomin Jeong

Climate Services Research Department, APEC Climate Center, Busan, South Korea

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Uran Chung

Uran Chung

Climate Services Research Department, APEC Climate Center, Busan, South Korea

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Kwang-Hyung Kim

Corresponding Author

Kwang-Hyung Kim

Climate Services Research Department, APEC Climate Center, Busan, South Korea

Correspondence

Kwang-Hyung Kim, Climate Services Research Department, APEC Climate Center, 12 Centum 7-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan, 612-020, South Korea.

Email: [email protected]

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First published: 23 August 2018
Citations: 10

Abstract

As the climate changes, increasing variations in environmental factors directly influence crop cultivation at different magnitudes over a broad range of local communities worldwide. As a result, there is an urgent need to develop local impact assessments and adaptation strategies for use at local, rather than national or global, levels. In this study, we predicted the future frost damage of kiwifruit in the Jeonnam province, Korea, as a case study for the local impact assessment of climate change. This study included a series of models that integrated both the biological responses of plants and the physical influences of climatic factors. First, potential changes in the suitable area for kiwifruit cultivation under a changing climate were simulated using downscaled high resolution (1 km) climate data. Through the development of a frost-forecasting model and linking it to a kiwifruit phenology model, we also assessed the interaction of plant and climatic factors. Because of the warming climate, the last frost date in spring occurred 13.7 days earlier in average under climate change. Nevertheless, the potential risk of spring frost damage of kiwifruit continued to exist at a similar magnitude in the future. Additional study at the county level indicated that the date of bud burst is advancing even faster than the last frost date (approximately 1 day per every decade), resulting in the increasing risk of spring frost damage for kiwifruit through 2100. In this study, the local impacts of climate change on kiwifruit frost damage were assessed using the integrated modelling approach. As such, local policy makers and stakeholders will be able to prepare more realistic adaptation strategies to cope with upcoming threats in a changing climate.